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New IP address

macman

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Having already bench tested my new Hikvision POE cameras, they are due to be installed after Xmas; however, next week, my old-world BT copper wire ultraslow broadband service will be replaced by gigabit FTTP from a different provider so I will be assigned a new IP (presumably I need to make sure I get a static IP in order to keep the cameras working). Will I have to start the camera setup from scratch again or is it as simple as entering the new IP address on the config page?
 

Dan

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Having already bench tested my new Hikvision POE cameras, they are due to be installed after Xmas; however, next week, my old-world BT copper wire ultraslow broadband service will be replaced by gigabit FTTP from a different provider so I will be assigned a new IP (presumably I need to make sure I get a static IP in order to keep the cameras working). Will I have to start the camera setup from scratch again or is it as simple as entering the new IP address on the config page?
If anything does change it will just be the IP range, so it might change from 192.168.1.xxx to 192.168.4.xxx and all you will have to do is change the IP address of any cameras/NVR connected directly to the Local network to match that new range. The simplest way to do this if you have a lot of cameras is to use the Hikvision SADP tool and go through one device at a time, Hikvision does have a batch configuration tool but in case anything goes wrong we would recommend changing one at a time.

Other than changing the IP address to match your new LAN range there shouldn't be anything else you need to change.
 

macman

Active Member
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250
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Thanks Dan. If you're at a loose end in Jan, and fancy a two-day trip to Maidenhead, I would be (very) happy to give you the job.
 

macman

Active Member
Messages
250
Points
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A supplementary question if I may… My new fibre broadband service will be delivered through a Linksys Velop tri-band router with three Velop 'mesh' nodes spread around the house. The first node will be ethernet-wired to the router and subsequent nodes can either be daisy-chained to the first node via ethernet or left unconnected to operate wirelessly. Each node has two RJ45 ports which means that a daisy-chained node would have no spare ports unless I use a splitter.

So, I know that my CCTV POE switch can function if plugged into a wired node. But will it also function if plugged into a non-POE ethernet splitter? And would it still function if I wanted to plug it into an unwired node? All nodes and splitters are mains-powered. TIA.
 

macman

Active Member
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Ethernet hub/splitter will be no impediment, I am assured.
 

Sonic007

Member
Messages
88
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8
With a lot of data going through it, I'd be tempted to hard wire the POE switch to the router and not go via the Wirelss access points.
 

macman

Active Member
Messages
250
Points
28
I will be hardwiring the POE switch to a hardwired node so it will be the same result as connecting directly to the router. That said, I got my fibre broadband installed today and I'm getting a rock-steady 500Mbps wi-fi signal throughout the property on an uncontended line. Even so, I'm conditioned to not trusting wi-fi so that's likely to continue for some time.
 
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